A General Introduction to the Bible by Norman L. Geisler

By Norman L. Geisler

The publication is split up into 4 significant parts,

Part one: idea of the Bible

Part : Canonization of the Bible

Part 3: Transmission of the Bible

Part 4: Translation of the Bible

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Deuteronomy In Deuteronomy, Moses’ speeches are regarded as God’s word, saying, “You shall not add to the word which I am commanding you, nor take away from it” (4:2); it even sets forth tests of truth for divine utterances: “When a prophet speaks in the name of the Lord, if the thing does not come about or come true, that is the thing which the Lord has not spoken” (18:22). Joshua In this book, Joshua relates how “after the death of Moses . . the Lord spoke to Joshua, ‘This day I will begin to exalt you in the sight of all Israel, that they may know that just as I was with Moses, I will be with you’” (1:1–3:7).

4:1; 5:14; 6:1, 8). Numbers This book repeatedly records, “The Lord spoke to Moses” (1:1; see 2:1; 4:1; 5:1; 6:1; 8:1), and it closes by saying, “These are the commandments and the ordinances which the Lord commanded to the sons of Israel” (36:13). Deuteronomy In Deuteronomy, Moses’ speeches are regarded as God’s word, saying, “You shall not add to the word which I am commanding you, nor take away from it” (4:2); it even sets forth tests of truth for divine utterances: “When a prophet speaks in the name of the Lord, if the thing does not come about or come true, that is the thing which the Lord has not spoken” (18:22).

1), but each one has an explicit claim, as Amos 1:3 and the opening verse in each of the following books indicate: Hosea, Joel,Obadiah, Jonah, Micah, Nahum, Habakkuk, Zephaniah, Haggai, Zechariah,Malachi. Although many of these revelations were given originally in oral delivery, they were eventually preserved in written form. Numerous references to such written utterances from God are provided in Scripture (cf. 2 Chron. 21:12; Isa. 30:8; Jer. 25:13; 29:1; 30:2; 36:2; 51:60; Ezek. 43:11; Dan. 7:1 Hab.

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