41 Shots . . . and Counting: What Amadou Diallo's Story by Beth Roy

By Beth Roy

While 4 manhattan urban cops killed Amadou Diallo in 1999, the 41 photographs they fired echoed loudly around the kingdom. In dying, Diallo joined an extended record of younger males of colour killed by means of police hearth in towns and cities all throughout the USA. via innuendos of illegal activity, a lot of those sufferers can be discredited and, via implication, held accountable for their very own deaths. yet Diallo was once an blameless, a tender West African immigrant doing not anything extra suspicious than returning domestic to his Bronx condo after operating challenging all day within the urban. Protesters took to the streets, effectively difficult that the 4 white officials be delivered to trial. while the officials have been acquitted, despite the fact that, horrified onlookers of all races and ethnicities despaired of justice. In forty-one pictures . . . and Counting, Beth Roy deals an oral historical past of Diallo's demise. via interviews with participants of the group, with cops and attorneys, with executive officers and moms of younger males in jeopardy, the ebook lines the political and racial dynamics that put the officials outdoor Diallo's residence that evening, their arms on symbolic in addition to genuine triggers. With lucid research, Roy explores occasions within the court, in urban corridor, within the streets, and within the police precinct, revealing the interlacing clash dynamics. forty-one photographs . . . and Counting permits the reader to think about the results of the Diallo case for our nationwide discourses on politics, race, category, crime, and social justice.

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41 Shots . . . and Counting: What Amadou Diallo's Story Teaches Us About Policing, Race, and Justice (Syracuse Studies on Peace and Conflict Resolution)

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Extra resources for 41 Shots . . . and Counting: What Amadou Diallo's Story Teaches Us About Policing, Race, and Justice (Syracuse Studies on Peace and Conflict Resolution)

Sample text

But in arguing that Sean Carroll’s confusion of a wallet for a gun was believable and unavoidable, by mimicking a gesture he had not himself seen, John introduced into the courtroom a portrayal of Diallo that contrasted dramatically with the wholesomeness and emotional frailty expressed by the officers. Their misunderstanding became understandable; something “suggestive” became a reality in the minds and trigger fingers of the police officers. Diallo’s “devastation,” Defining the Question: In the Courtroom  31 in John Patten’s account, was not the victim’s alone; it was shared by the officers.

But the questions disallowed in the courtroom reverberated outside its doors: • Were the officers justified in being where they were, on that Bronx street searching for miscreants? • Was their suspicion of Diallo reasonable and justified? • In using lethal force were they within the boundaries not only of police procedure but of human morality? Even as the jury parsed the evidence in obedience to the judge’s instructions and decided the officers were innocent, people outside the courthouse, struggling with a different set of questions, were coming up with very different answers.

In Louima you had a police officer who went berserk, went out of control. It was really sad in one way, because for a few minutes or a few seconds’ craziness he will now do thirty years in jail. And also Louima’s scarred for life, the trauma of having whatever happened to him happen. Okay? But Nickerson, the judge, said to the jury panel that was seated in the room, and it was amazing how once he said it, it seemed to end, he said, “This is not a case about race. This is a case about what happened in the bathroom.

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